Why worry when you can fly

Hobbit sized Sailor Moon.

unsurpassedtravesty:

kindergraph:

goodbye

Minako is a problem solver.

(via delicious-hiddle-morsels)

scifi-fantasy-horror:

by BRAM SELS

Sam & Cait being adorable at public appearances.

(Source: sassenach-mogradh, via theheirsofdurin)


→“I need more Richard Armitage on my dash” (1232 of ?)

“I need more Richard Armitage on my dash” (1232 of ?)

(Source: mrpuddingston, via twelfthnightmare)

friendlyaxolotl:

comic about how I’ve been feeling recently

(Source: axolottl, via colorishful)

I have the prettiest cat in the world.

freshmountains:

"i wish i had a british accent"

ah yes, the british accentimage

the singular british accent

(via anditsrainingonthecoast)

anunexpectedhotdwarf:

New stills from the Desolation of Smaug Extended Edition! Click for very large version! watch the trailer here

dailydragons:

Dragon by Alexandra Khitrova (DeviantArt | Facebook)

dailydragons:

Dragon by Alexandra Khitrova (DeviantArt | Facebook)

eowyns:

we’ll go down in h i s t o r y

remember me for c e n t u r i e s

insp (x)

(via anunexpectedhotdwarf)

(Source: z-saldana)

The Scarlet Pimpernel is also a romance, one that formulaically matches Pride and Prejudice. It’s told from the perspective of its female protagonist, Marguerite, who, like Austen’s Elizabeth, is blind to the true character of the novel’s hero. Elizabeth thinks Mr. Darcy is an arrogant jerk. Marguerite thinks Sir Percy is a cowardly fool. Or they do for the first halves of their novels, because after a pivotal middle scene (Mr. Darcy proposes, Marguerite confesses), the second halves are spent revealing Darcy’s and Percy’s secret heroism. Austen uses the word “disguise,” Orczy prefers “mask,” but both metaphors must be removed.

That also requires some suffering, since Elizabeth and Marguerite must recognize their mistakes in order to be united with their heroes. Austen says “humbled.” Orczy says, “the elegant and fashionable [Marguerite], who had dazzled London society with her beauty, her wit and her extravagances, presented a very pathetic picture of tired-out, suffering womanhood.” Unmasked hero and humbled heroine may now live happily everafter.

Jerry Siegel adopted the Austen-Orczy formula too. As long as Lois Lane can’t see through Clark’s disguise, she can’t be united with her Superman. But Austen mostly and Orczy entirely limit their perspectives to their heroines’ points of view. Siegel sticks with his hero. When Joe Shuster draws Clark changing into Superman, readers witness the unmasking, but Lois doesn’t. She’s stuck in the first half of Elizabeth’s and Marguerite’s plotline. Austen’s and Orczy’s readers learn with their heroines, but Superman readers can already see Lois’ mistake. Shuster even draws Clark laughing behind her back. She is “humbled,” but she can’t learn from it and so can’t be united with her would-be lover. The romance plot is frozen.

Siegel did try to reach the second half of Pride and Prejudice though—perhaps as a result of having reached marital closure himself. In 1940, two years into writing Superman, and two months into his own marriage, he submitted a script in which Superman unmasks to Lois.


LOIS: “Why didn’t you ever tell me who you really are?”

SUPERMAN: “Because if people were to learn my true identity, it would hamper me in my mission to save humanity.”

LOIS: “Your attitude of cowardliness as Clark Kent—it was just a screen to keep the world from learning who you really are! But there’s one thing I must know: was your—er—affection for me, in your role as Clark Kent, also a pretense?”

SUPERMAN: “THAT was the genuine article, Lois!”


The revelation completes the Austen formula. When Darcy tells Elizabeth, “You taught me a lesson, hard indeed at first, but most advantageous. By you I was properly humbled,” the two can unite because now they are on the same plane. Superman comes to his “momentous decision” after Siegel introduces the superpower-stripping “K-Metal from Krypton,” the only substance that can humble the Man of Steel.

But the story was rejected. An editor wrote in the margin: “It is not a good idea to let others in on the secret.” It would have run in Action Comics No. 20. Instead, Clark reveals himself to Lois in No. 662, fifty years later. They married in 1996, the year Jerry Siegel died.

—   

Pride and Prejudice and Superheroes

"Without Pride and Prejudice, my favorite 1930s space alien, Superman, would not exist. Jane Austen is Jerry Siegel’s secret collaborator, and without her, the comic book genre that followed Action Comics No. 1 wouldn’t exist either."

(via ravingsofanundiscoveredgenius)

(via howtoprideandprejudice)